Radiocarbon dating inconsistencies

In a combustion and graphitization setup like that installed at INFN-LABEC, Florence, measurement can be easily performed using an elemental analyzer when combusting the sample prior to graphitization, thus requiring no extra effort (or extra amount of sample) during the preparation procedure.

Bone samples recently 14C dated at INFN-LABEC have confirmed that the measurement of C/N atomic ratios can give some indications of the collagen quality.

About one carbon nucleus in a trillion contains two extra neutrons, giving a mass of 14.

This carbon-14 is radioactive and decays with a half-life of 5730 years.

Archaeological bones are usually dated by radiocarbon measurement of extracted collagen.

However, low collagen content, contamination from the burial environment, or museum conservation work, such as addition of glues, preservatives, and fumigants to “protect” archaeological materials, have previously led to inaccurate dates.

Among these, the C/N atomic ratio is considered a good parameter for detecting low-quality collagen and possibly contaminated samples.

—Charles Ginenthal, 1997 Many of the most obvious conflicts between science and religion involve timing issues—the dating of events in Earth’s history. Scott wrote: “It has long been acknowledged, though not always fully acted upon, that radiocarbon dating measurements are not definitive, i.e. “If a C14 date supports our theories, we put it in the main text.

Bible chronologies typically list Adam and Eve at about 4,000 BC. they do not produce precise age estimates.” Failing to acknowledge this lack of precision, a Nova program that aired in 2009 showed a paleontologist who had found a skeleton of an extinct animal deep in a cave. If it does not entirely contradict them, we put it in a foot-note.

Radiocarbon dating of bones can be very useful in archaeological contexts, especially when dealing with funerary deposits lacking material culture, e.g. 14C measurements of bone samples are usually performed on the extracted collagen residue.

The content and the quality of collagen can vary significantly, mainly depending on bone preservation and diagenesis.

Search for radiocarbon dating inconsistencies:

radiocarbon dating inconsistencies-36radiocarbon dating inconsistencies-73

They are: (1) the C14 concentration in a specimen at its time of death; (2) the decay rate of C14; (3) the current C14 concentration in the specimen being “dated”; and (4) if anything else has affected the specimen’s C14 content. The curved line represents the declining amount of C14 atoms over time due to radioactive decay.

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